baby bird - common birds of Thailand

Common Birds of Thailand

In this blog post, The Most Common Birds of Thailand, I want to share with you some of the most commonly encountered feathered friends I spot on my permaculture farm. I’ll highlight their unique characteristics and behaviours, and exploring their significance to the ecosystem.

I’m no twitcher or an expert on birds so it’s been fun learning more about them to write this post. I do however enjoy them eating, singing and raising their little families on our permaculture fruit farm and food forest.

So without and further ado, let’s get off to a flying start with some of the most common birds of Thailand

 

Common Kingfisher

Blue-winged Pitta

I’m always excited to see the Blue-winged Pitta (Pitta moluccensis) on my property. It’s a small, stocky bird with brightly coloured plumage and a distinctive blue wing patch. They have a dark green head, back, and tail, and a yellow breast, belly and throat. They are around 20-25 cm in length.

I used to think pitta’s were kingfishers but I think I’ve identified this bird correctly now. I’m sure the internet will let me know if I’m wrong!

Blue-winged Pittas are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, and they are native to Southeast Asia. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, and small animals. They are active during the day and are often seen foraging on the forest floor or in bushes. They are also known for their loud calls, which are heard more often than seen. They are also known for being elusive and difficult to spot, as they often stay hidden in dense undergrowth.

Blue-winged Pittas are typically found near freshwater sources such as rivers, streams, and ponds, as well as along coastlines where they can prey on small aquatic animals. They are solitary birds although I do see a couple together on the road up to our house occasionally. I think that is during the breeding season.

They spend most of their time perched on branches overlooking the water, waiting for prey. They are active during the day, but I’ve noticed they tend to be more active at dawn and dusk, when it’s cooler, the light is lower and prey is more active.

Blue-winged Pittas play a key role in controlling the populations of small aquatic animals, preventing them from becoming too numerous and damaging their ecosystems. They are also important indicators of the health of freshwater systems and coastal areas. As they are a sign of clean water and healthy ecosystems and are affected by pollution, their presence or absence can be used to gauge the overall health of an area’s environment. We do our bit of conservation to preserve their habitat so it is possible to help ensure the survival of this important species for future generations.

Blue-winged Pittas also have an important role in the food chain (easy to see), as they are a food source for larger predators such as snakes, birds of prey and mammals. Also the fish and other aquatic animals that they prey on are important food for other species such as herons. This makes the Blue-winged Pittas not only a beautiful addition to the garden, but also a vital link in the ecosystem, helping to maintain balance within the food chain.

Drongo Bird on a Wire

Black Drongo

The Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus) is a medium-sized bird with a glossy black plumage and a very long, forked tail. They have a distinctive fan-shaped crest, which they can raise or lower depending on their mood. They have a metallic sheen to the black plumage that gives them a glossy appearance. They are around 28-30 cm in length.

Black Drongos are found in a wide range of habitats including forests, grasslands, and cultivated areas. They are highly adaptable birds and can be found in both rural and urban areas. They are active during the day, and I often seen from my office window perching on the wires. They are known for their aerial acrobatics, chasing and catching insects on the wing, often in pairs. Black Drongos are also known for their mimicry, often impersonating the calls of other birds and animals.

I heard anecdotally that Drongos are very protective of their nesting sites even attacking Brahminy Kites that get too close. My dog and I can also confirm this as often in May/ June we have been dived bombed by a pair as we walk a farm track to the rear of our property. This send us both running like in a scene from director Alfred Hitchcockss’ ‘The Birds‘.

Beside their aggressive territorial nature, Black Drongos play an important role in controlling insect populations, as they are known to feed on a wide range of insects including mosquitoes, flies, and beetles. Additionally, as a perch hunter, they also provide valuable pest control services in agricultural fields and gardens. They also have a role in ecosystem service by pollinating the flowers and act as a seed dispersal agent. Black Drongos are considered beneficial to farmers and gardeners alike.

Asian Koel

Koel

The Koel (Eudynamys scolopaceus), also known as the Asian Koel and Nok Kawow in Thai is a large and distinctive cuckoo bird with a glossy black plumage and a long tail. The male Koel has a metallic green sheen on the head, back and wings. The female is duller and browner, with a pale underbelly. The Koel is about 40cm in length.

Koels are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, woodlands and orchards. They are migratory birds, which migrate to tropical Asia from Australasia for the breeding season. During this time, they can be found throughout Thailand and are heard more often than seen. Usually outside my bedroom window just before sunrise. They are known for their distinctive and loud calls, and are active during the day. They feed on fruits and insects.

Koels play an important role in controlling the populations of certain insects, as they feed on fruits, insects and arthropods. They also have a role in seed dispersal and play a part in pollination. Koels are culturally significant in many areas, and their distinctive calls are often incorporated into traditional music and folklore.

They are also valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking plumage and vocal abilities. They are a brood parasitism cuckoo which is rare among bird species. However this could affect the host species as they are known to lay eggs on other bird nests, and the chicks are fed by the host, which can lead to a depletion of resources.

Great Egret

Great Egret

The Great Egret (Ardea alba), also known as the Great White Egret, is a large and stately waterbird with a white plumage, a long, thick, pointed yellow bill and long legs. The great egret’s wingspan can reach up to 4.5 feet (1.4 m). They are around 90-100 cm in length.

Great Egrets are typically found near freshwater and saltwater bodies such as rice fields, rivers, ponds, marshes, estuaries, and mangroves. They are active during the day and typically hunt for fish, crustaceans, and other small aquatic animals by stalking through shallow water or standing still and waiting for prey to come within reach. They are also known to feed on amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals.

I often surprise them near our ponds. They fly off, circle back around and perch in a tree and wait for me to disappear, before they return.

Great Egrets play an important role in controlling the populations of small aquatic animals, preventing them from becoming too numerous and damaging their ecosystems. They are also important indicators of the health of freshwater ecosystems. They are valuable to birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking white plumage and feeding behaviour. They are also vulnerable to habitat destruction and pollution, which highlights the importance of preserving wetlands and other habitats.

Kite - Birds of Thailand

Brahminy Kite

The Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) is a medium-sized bird of prey with a distinctive reddish-brown plumage and a white head. It has a deeply forked tail and a broad wingspan. They are around 50-55 cm in length. To me they look like the American Bald Eagle but smaller is size and weight.

Brahminy Kites are found in a wide range of habitats including coastal areas, forests, ponds and grasslands. They are highly adaptable and can be found in both rural and urban areas. They are known to be opportunistic feeders and are often seen scavenging for food, as well as hunting for small animals such as fish, reptiles, and mammals.

They are also known to feed on carrion, and I often find myself following them in my truck down the twists and turns or the country roads where I live as they look for road kill. They are active during the day and I’m fortunate to  see them most days soaring in the sky, while I’m walking the dogs.

Brahminy Kites play an important role in controlling the populations of small animals and insects, as well as maintaining a balance in the ecosystem. They also help to control the population of rats and squirrels, which can be a problem in agricultural areas.

The best place to see them on mass in Trat is at Konpludthin Fishing Park, a lake side restaurant that feeds them offal from a boat. Maybe a hundred Kite skim the water to take the bait. It’s great to see this spectacle.

Common Myna

Common Myna

The Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis), also known as Indian Myna, is a medium-sized bird with a distinctive brown plumage and a black head with a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye. It has a long, curved beak and a short tail. They are around 25-30 cm in length.

Common Mynas are found in a wide range of habitats, from forests to urban areas. They are highly adaptable and can thrive in many different environments. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, and human-provided food. They are active during the day and often seen in flocks. They are also known for their intelligence and ability to mimic sounds, including human speech.

Common Mynas play an important role in controlling the populations of insects, but they can also have a negative impact on the ecosystem, as they can outcompete native bird species for food and nesting sites. They are also known to damage fruit crops (it’s true), and can be a nuisance to humans with their loud calls and tendency to nest in buildings.

Large-billed Crow

Large-billed Crow

The Large-billed Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos), also known as the Jungle Crow, is a large and distinctive member of the crow family with a glossy black plumage and a long, thick bill. They have a wingspan of around 80-90 cm and are around 45-50 cm in length.

Large-billed Crows are found in a wide range of habitats including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. They are highly adaptable and can thrive in many different environments. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, small animals, and carrion. They are active during the day and often seen in flocks. They are also known for their intelligence and problem-solving abilities.

Large-billed Crows play an important role in controlling the populations of insects and small animals, as well as cleaning the environment by scavenging on dead animals and other waste. They also help to control the population of rats, which can be a problem in agricultural areas. They are also considered as an indicator of the health of the ecosystem, as they are highly adaptable to human-altered environments.

However, they are also known to be a nuisance to humans with their loud calls, tendency to nest in buildings and can cause damage to crops. They are also known to have a negative impact on native bird species, as they can outcompete them for food and nesting sites. Despite this, they are valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists. They also have a symbolic role in some cultures.

Eurasian Tree Sparrow

Eurasian Tree Sparrow

The Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) is a small, sparrow-like bird with a distinctive black and white striped head, a reddish-brown back and wings, and a grey-white underbelly. They have a wingspan of around 20-25 cm and are around 14-16 cm in length.

Eurasian Tree Sparrows are typically found in open woodlands, gardens, and cultivated areas, as well as in urban and suburban environments. They are active during the day and can often be seen flitting through trees and bushes, searching for food. They feed on a variety of seeds and insects, and are known to be opportunistic feeders. They are also known for their lively and sociable behaviour, often forming flocks with other sparrow species.

Eurasian Tree Sparrows play an important role in controlling the populations of insects, as well as helping to disperse plant seeds. They also provide aesthetic value and interest for bird watchers and nature enthusiasts. They are considered as a garden bird, and their population decline in recent years is a concern for conservation as I can attest. As a boy I recall seeing flocks of common sparrows in England, but unfortunately nowadays, I only see one or two at most at any time.

Oriental Magpie Robin

Oriental Magpie Robin

The Oriental Magpie Robin (Copsychus saularis) is a medium-sized bird with a distinctive black and white plumage, and a long, graduated tail. They have a black head, back and wings, and a white belly and rump. The male has a black throat and the female has a white throat. They are around 20-25 cm in length.

Oriental Magpie Robins are typically found in a wide range of habitats, including forests, gardens, and cultivated areas, as well as in urban and suburban environments. They are active during the day and can often be seen perched on branches or wires, singing beautiful and melodic song. They feed on a variety of insects, berries, and fruits. They are also known for their lively and sociable behaviour, often forming flocks with other bird species.

Oriental Magpie Robins play an important role in controlling the populations of insects, as well as helping to disperse seeds of plants. For this reason they are also considered beneficial to farmers and gardeners. They also provide aesthetic value and interest for bird watchers and nature enthusiasts. They are also considered as a garden bird, and their population is stable and are not considered endangered.

Swan Goose

Swan Goose

The Swan Goose (Anser cygnoides) is a large waterfowl with a long neck and a heavy, barrel-shaped body. They have a white plumage with black primary feathers, and a black and white head. They have a wingspan of around 160-180 cm and are around 90-110 cm in length.

Swan Geese are typically found in freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, ponds, and rivers. They are migratory birds and can be found in Thailand during the non-breeding season. They are known to feed on a wide range of aquatic plants and animals, such as roots, shoots, leaves, seeds, and insects, as well as small fish, molluscs, and crustaceans.

We have 2 at the farm named “Dollar’ and ‘Euro”. They are quite the characters and very vocal. Most times they protect our flock of ISA brown chickens, but on occasion attack and even kill them.

Swan Geese play an important role in controlling the populations of aquatic plants, trimming the grass and fertilising the soil. They are also valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking plumage and feeding behaviour. They are considered as a vulnerable species due to habitat destruction, hunting, and pollution. We consider them as pets and part of our farm family.

Jungle Fowl

Junglefowl

The Jungle-fowl (Gallus gallus), also known as the Red Jungle-fowl, is a medium-sized bird with a distinctive red and orange plumage, and a long, graduated tail. The male has a red and orange plumage with a green and blue head and a long white tail (Dollar nipped the tail off the cock in the picture above). The female is smaller and has a more subdued brown plumage. They are around 60-70 cm in length.

Jungle-fowl are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, and they are native to Southeast Asia. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, and small animals. They are active during the day and are often seen foraging on the forest floor or roosting in trees. They are also known for their loud calls, which are heard more often than seen.

We have adopted (or they adopted us) two jungle chickens. One lives in our permaculture food forest and the other on our farm and they take care of our free-range hens. Both are strikingly handsome with flamboyant plumage and tail feathers.

Junglefowl play an important role in controlling the populations of insects and fruits, as well as helping to disperse seeds of plants. They are also considered as an indicator of the health of the ecosystem, as they are highly adaptable to natural environments. They also have a cultural significance in many areas and have a symbolic role in some cultures.

They are considered as a vulnerable species due to habitat destruction, hunting, and pollution. They are also considered as an ancestor of domesticated chickens, which have been domesticated for thousands of years. That chicken story actually started in Thailand. Who would have thought!

White-crested Laughing Thrush

White-crested Laughing Thrush

The White-crested Laughing Thrush (Garrulax leucolophus) is a medium-sized bird with a distinctive white crest and a black and white plumage. They have a black head and back, white underparts and a black tail. They are around 25-30 cm in length.

White-crested Laughing thrushes are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, and they are native to Southeast Asia. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, and small animals. They are active during the day and are often seen in flocks foraging on the forest floor or in bushes. They are also known for their loud calls and chatter, which are heard more often than seen. They are often seen in a large flock of 15 to 20 birds most evening on the farm, especially after irrigating or during the fruit season. They are known for their lively and social behaviour and are fun to watch.

White-crested Laughing thrushes play an important role in controlling the populations of insects and eating fallen fruits, as well as helping to disperse seeds of plants. They are also considered as an indicator of the health of the ecosystem, as they are highly adaptable to natural environments. They are also valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking plumage and vocal abilities.

These birds are one of my personal favourites on the farm. They are really social bird and fun to observe.

Watch a white-crested laughing thrush ground feeding in this short video.

Zebra Dove

Zebra Dove

The Zebra Dove (Geopelia striata) is a small, plump bird with a distinctive white and black striped plumage. They have a white face with a black crown and black stripes on their white breast and back. They are around 25 cm in length.

Zebra Doves are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, and they are native to Southeast Asia. They are also commonly found in urban and suburban areas, and are often seen in parks and gardens. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including seeds, fruits, and insects. They are active during the day and are often seen perched on branches or wires, singing melodic cooing call.

They are highly adaptable to human-altered environments and I often see them near the chicken run sponging a free meal and have got quite use to my presence. They are considered as a common species, not endangered.

Shrikes

Shrikes

Shrikes (Laniidae) are a group of birds that belong to the family Laniidae. They are known for their distinctive hooked beak and strong, hooked talons which they use to capture and impale their prey. They have a wide range of plumage patterns and colours, but most have a similar body shape and size, around 20-30 cm in length.

Shrikes are typically found in a wide range of habitats including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. They are active during the day and are known to be fierce predators, hunting and catching a wide range of prey such as insects, small mammals, reptiles, and other birds. They are known to impale their prey on thorns or barbed wire before eating it, a behaviour known as “larder hoarding.” They are also known for their territorial behaviour, and will defend their territories against other birds.

They are considered as a common species, not endangered. They are also valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking plumage, hunting behaviour and vocal abilities.

Swifts

Swifts

Swifts (Apodidae) are a group of birds that belong to the family Apodidae. They are known for their aerial abilities, spending most of their lives in the air and only landing to breed and roost. They are small to medium-sized birds, with a sleek, streamlined body and long, narrow wings. They can vary in size and colour depending on the species, but most have a similar shape and size, around 15-25 cm in length.

Swifts are typically found in a wide range of habitats including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. They are active during the day and are known to fly at high speeds and make acrobatic manoeuvres in the air while hunting for insects. They are also known for their aerial courtship displays, where they fly in tight formation with other swifts. They are also known for their loud calls, which are heard more often than seen.

I’ve noticed swifts feeding more during heavy rains and electrical storms. My guess is the rain disperses a lot of insects from the trees and the swifts are more than happy to dine a-la-carte on them.

Greater Coucal

Greater Coucal

The Greater Coucal (Centropus sinensis) is a large, crow-like bird with a distinctive glossy black plumage and a long, graduated tail. They have a long, curved bill and a distinctive red eye. They are around 45-50 cm in length.

Greater Coucals are typically found in a wide range of habitats including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. They are active during the day and are known to feed on a wide range of food, including fruits, insects, small animals, and even small reptiles and amphibians. They are known for their loud calls and for their secretive behaviour, often staying hidden in dense undergrowth. You didn’t hear this from me though, right!

Olive-backed Sunbirds

Olive-backed Sunbirds

The Olive-backed Sunbirds (Cinnyris jugularis) are small, brightly coloured birds with a distinctive olive-green plumage on the back, and a metallic sheen on the head, throat and breast. They have long, curved beaks and a distinctive long tail. They are around 10-15 cm in length.

Olive-backed Sunbirds are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests and urban environments. There are many similarities between sunbirds and hummingbirds, despite being unrelated and inhabiting different ecosystems. Africa and Asia are home to sunbirds, while the Americas are home to hummingbirds. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including nectar, insects, and small fruits. They are active during the day and are often seen flitting around flowers and bushes. They are also known for their melodic calls and are often heard before they are seen.

Olive-backed Sunbirds play an important role in pollination of plants by collecting nectar and transferring pollen between flowers. I often observe them feeding on the ‘bird of paradise’ flowers outside my office window early in the morning.

They are highly adaptable to natural and human-altered environments. They are considered as a common species, not endangered. They are welcomed by gardeners and also valued by birdwatchers and ornithologists for their striking plumage, vocal abilities, and their role in pollination.

 

Black-naped Oriole on my hand (1)

Black-naped Oriole

The Black-naped Oriole (Oriolus chinensis) is a medium-sized, brightly coloured bird with a distinctive black nape and yellow plumage. They have a black head, a bright yellow body and wings, and a long, graduated tail. They are around 25-30 cm in length.

Black-naped Orioles are typically found in tropical and subtropical forests, and they are native to Southeast Asia. They are also commonly found in gardens and cultivated areas. They are known to feed on a wide range of food, including nectar, insects, fruits, and small animals. They are active during the day and are often seen flitting around flowers and bushes, or perched on branches and wires. They are also known for their melodic calls.

This young fella in the above photo seemed a bit disorientated. He was super-friendly too. Catch a short video of our encounter here. After hanging out with me for the whole afternoon, he flew to the top of a mangosteen tree.

Black-crested bulbul - Common birds of Thailand

Black-crested Bulbul

The Black-crested Bulbul (Pycnonotus flaviventris) is a charming and widespread bird species found throughout Thailand, particularly in forested areas, open woodlands, and gardens. This medium-sized songbird is easily recognisable by its striking appearance, characterized by a glossy black crest atop its head, contrasting with its vibrant yellow underparts and olive-green upperparts. The species exhibits sexual dimorphism, with males typically displaying brighter plumage compared to females.

During the breeding season, which typically occurs from March to July, Black-crested Bulbuls engage in courtship displays that involve vocalisations and intricate behaviours. Males often sing melodious songs to attract females and establish their territory. Once pairs form, they build cup-shaped nests using twigs, grass, and other plant materials, usually located in the dense foliage of trees or shrubs. The photos of this family of Black-crested Bulbuls were taken on our farm located near Trat in February.

Clutches typically consist of two to three eggs, which are incubated by both parents for about 12 to 14 days. After hatching, the chicks are cared for by both parents, who diligently feed them a diet consisting of insects, fruits, berries, and seeds. The Black-crested Bulbul’s omnivorous diet allows it to adapt to various habitats, from forested areas to agricultural landscapes, making it a common sight for farmers and birdwatchers alike.

While the Black-crested Bulbul is not currently considered endangered, habitat loss and fragmentation pose significant threats to its population. Conservation efforts focused on preserving and restoring its preferred habitats are crucial for ensuring the continued survival of this species in Thailand and beyond. Additionally, raising awareness among local communities about the importance of preserving natural habitats and supporting sustainable farming practices can help mitigate further threats to the Black-crested Bulbul and other bird species in the region.

In my humble opinion, the Black-crested Bulbul is a captivating bird species that adds vibrancy to Thailand’s diverse avian fauna. Its striking appearance, melodious songs, and adaptable nature make it a welcome sight for both farmers and birdwatchers. By understanding and appreciating the ecological role of birds like the Black-crested Bulbul, we can work towards creating a harmonious balance between agriculture and conservation in Thailand‘s landscapes.

Oriental Pied Hornbill

Oriental Pied Hornbill

Let’s delve into the fascinating world of the Oriental Pied Hornbill, or as I like to call it, the “rockstar of the avian scene” in Thailand!

While they’re not exactly rare gems in Thailand, Oriental Pied Hornbills aren’t as common as your everyday pigeon either. Their population is said to be relatively stable.

I heard there were Hornbills on Koh Chang island, but I was never lucky enough to see one during all the time I lived there. Recently, Katae and I celebrated our wedding anniversary at Centera Talay and watched a pair in the trees on the shoreline early in the morning.

Apparently, when it comes to romance, Oriental Pied Hornbills are all about monogamy. During mating season, which typically falls between February and May, they engage in elaborate courtship displays. like bill-clapping and fruit-sharing. We were blessed to share our anniversary with them.

Now, let’s talk about their dining preferences. Hornbills are frugivores, and like me are all about the fruits, baby! They gobble up a variety of juicy treats like figs, berries, and even the occasional insect snack (not like me). They’re like the gourmet foodies of the bird world.

While there isn’t an exact headcount of Oriental Pied Hornbills in Thailand, they are considered relatively common in suitable habitats throughout the Kingdom. However, their habitat is under pressure, so it’s crucial to keep an eye on their conservation status and work towards preserving their lush forest homes.

So, there you have it! The Oriental Pied Hornbill is a charismatic and vital part of Thailand’s diverse avian community, bringing both beauty and charm to the tropical forests they call home.

Perry and a bird of Thailand

Thailand is home to an incredible diversity of bird species, and whether at home or on my farm, I am fortunate enough to see many of these birds on a regular basis. From the vibrant plumage of the Blue-winged Pitta to the melodic calls of the Black-naped Oriole, these birds bring a sense of wonder and beauty to my daily life.

Hopefully I’ve highlighted some of the most common birds that can be found in Thailand. From the majestic Great Egret to the cheeky and chatty White-crested Laughing thrushes, each of these birds has its own unique characteristics and plays an important role in the ecosystem.

In addition to their ecological significance, these birds also hold cultural and symbolic importance in many areas. The Jungle-fowl, for example, is considered an ancestor of domesticated chickens, while the Black-naped Oriole is a symbol of good luck and prosperity.

Overall, this article has highlight the beauty and diversity of just some of the common birds of Thailand that can be found on my organic farm. We go out of our way to provide a safe haven and encourage more wild life.

I hope that it has provided an appreciation for the birds that share our world and the important role they play in our ecosystems. Whether you’re a seasoned birdwatcher (twitcher) or just starting to explore the world of birds, I encourage you to take a closer look at the birds in your own backyard and appreciate the wonder and joy they bring to our lives (even that annoying vocal Koel outside my bedroom window at 6am every morning).

If you liked this post, consider giving it a tweet! Cheers!

Young Sun Bird - birds of Thailand

The Most Common Birds of Thailand: A Field Guide for Farmers and Birdwatchers

4 Comments

  • Glyn April 8, 2024

    I am enjoying your article on common Thai birds. Thanks. Glyn

  • chris korat April 11, 2024

    I’ve only had a cursory glance at your web page, but your photo of a Black Drongo is actually of a Greater Racket-tailed Drongo.

    • Perry Stevens (Post author) April 11, 2024

      Thanks for your message Chris. It’s hard to tell them apart. I captured the photo at dusk. What is the definitive detail that confirms it’s a Greater Racket-tailed Drongo?

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